Walk The Talk – Peter Andrews – Clip 4

www.farmingsecrets.com Peter says this is how hard it is to tell humans what is good common sense. Listen as Peter explains the importance of a tree and the resulting affect in the landscape.
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3 Responses

  1. This is a brilliant comment on the importance of trees in the landscape. What seems to be common sense is that the whole construct of a large tree in the landscape is many fold, the canopy transpires water vapour into the atmosphere, the canopy also protects the impact of raindrops from the soil below, the water is then directed slowly, to drip of the tips of the leaves, and to travel down the branches and trunk into the surrounding soil without washing it away, creating rill and gully erosion, etc. The tree itself changes its local microclimate making it much less extreme by providing shade, windbreak, adding water vapour to the air immediately surrounding the tree, and then protecting the soil with its leaves and twigs, providing a haven for smaller organisms which break down the leaves, in turn providing nutrients back into the system and food source for surrounding birds and reptiles (insect lavae and adult beetles, etc) and finally the branches and trunk provide nesting and refuge for birds and other animals that are otherwise expposed and vulnerable. All of this and they occupy the vacant air space so beautifully, how can we not appreciate their wonder and their role in our good life?

  2. Some practical ideas would be useful. For example, would it work to fence off areas from cattle by just connecting a group of trees with barbed wire? Thus saving the costs of fence posts and the need to transport them?

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