The Incredible Blueprint of the Ancient Australian Landscape – Peter Andrews has a vision to share.

Can you imagine… going directly from drought to paradise?
Australia is experiencing the worst drought for more than 100 years.
But despite this, there is still hope and a great opportunity…

The UN is declaring 2021-2030 The Decade of Ecosystem Restoration. And Australia can take a leading role.

Peter Andrews is a farmer who believes this is possible by using the basic patterns and following simple rules that can be observed in the ancient Australian landscape.

For many millions of years Australia evolved a highly productive and fully automated ecosystem with a huge diversity of plants (and animals) that managed the landscape from watershed to estuary with nearly 100% efficiency despite enduring many cycles of extreme climate conditions.

40 years ago, Peter Andrews began to study this natural sequence at Tarwyn Park in the Bylong Valley. Peter’s agricultural methods of Natural Sequence Farming have become wildly popular and the UN has officially recognised Natural Sequence Farming as a sustainable agricultural practice -one of only five in the world.

Now, Peter has a bold new vision. A new beginning for the Australian landscape. The complete restoration of river systems and floodplains across Australia, by 2030.

In collaboration with a panel of international experts and scientists this major project will restore soil health, water health, food health… and generate thousands of sustainable jobs in the process.

The next steps forward are:
Establish an advisory body
Train-the-trainers program
Community group activation
Within one month, there can be groups restoring every region.

The ancient Australian landscape contains the blueprint we need to go from drought to paradise.

Peter is ready to go today. But he can’t go it alone. Everyone has a role to play… You can make a big difference. Send this message across Australia, and share it around the world. Let’s make it happen!

Credit: https://www.peterandrewsoam.com/

 

2 Comments

  1. Mark Harrington

    I have a river on my boundary that is encroaching onto my property endangering many large trees.I would like to know what I can do to prevent this.

    Reply
    • Helen

      Hi Mark
      I am not quite sure what you are saying here. Firstly do you talk to the neighbour whose property has the river?

      Reply

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