Book – Why Didn’t My Grandmother Get Fat?… and Why Did I?

Available in Australia Only

Does eating fat make you fat? Why is it that our forebears ate animal fat as a significant part of their diet and did not, as an overall generation, become as fat as we are becoming today? This book supports the proposition that the consumption of fats from animals that have been continuously fed and ‘finished’ on grass is a healthy food option—an option that can aid in weight control and reduction. David asks whether the ‘food plate’ promoted by health authorities in Australia, and the ‘food pyramid’ promoted in the United States, are based on flawed assumptions. Could the advance in the number of overweight and obese people in western countries be due, in part, to the very advice our health authorities are giving us? This book is not intended to be a scholarly and academic paper. It is a work of journalism, a polemic, in which a case is argued. David’s aim is not to tell anybody what they should be doing. His aim is to encourage people to ask a similar set of questions about their diet as he asked. He wants to share his experience and invite others to consider whether there are any lessons in it for them.

 

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Does eating fat make you fat? Why is it that our forebears ate animal fat as a significant part of their diet and did not, as an overall generation, become as fat as we are becoming today? This book supports the proposition that the consumption of fats from animals that have been continuously fed and ‘finished’ on grass is a healthy food option—an option that can aid in weight control and reduction. David asks whether the ‘food plate’ promoted by health authorities in Australia, and the ‘food pyramid’ promoted in the United States, are based on flawed assumptions. Could the advance in the number of overweight and obese people in western countries be due, in part, to the very advice our health authorities are giving us? This book is not intended to be a scholarly and academic paper. It is a work of journalism, a polemic, in which a case is argued. David’s aim is not to tell anybody what they should be doing. His aim is to encourage people to ask a similar set of questions about their diet as he asked. He wants to share his experience and invite others to consider whether there are any lessons in it for them.

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We have 10 copies signed by the author

CHAPTERS:
1 Minding our barbeque manners
2 My Grandmother’s kitchen
3 The Aborigines of Montgomery Reef
4 Can public health authorities make mistakes?
5 How did we get wrong-footed?
6 The human feedlot
7 Why did I get fat?
8 Coming to grips with the awful truth
9 Tackling the challenge
10 A farmer’s moment of truth
11 The boutique butcher
12 The commitment of an executive chef
13 But aren’t our cattle warming the planet?
14 In search of super food
15 Super food: A case study
16 Food: Reversing the outsourcing trend
17 Reconnecting with farmers
18 Progress with organic marketing
19 What does free range mean?
20 Marketing jargon, labeling, advertising
21 Bread
22 Milk
23 Being rigorous about solutions
24 The appalling public health response PART I
25 The appalling public health response PART II
26 The appalling public health response PART III
27 The appalling public health response PART IV
28 Which generation of Pottengers’ Cats?
29 The risks and rewards for me
30 Joining the dots

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